U.S. Sets Termination Date for the Temporary Protected Status Programme

The termination date is set for January 2019. The Temporary Protected Status (TPS) programme came into play in 1999 after Hurricane Mitch devasted parts of Central America in late 1998. The programme allowed for citizens of Central American countries, such as Honduras and Nicarauga, to apply for visas to stay in the United States, temporailiy, until their countries could be restored to a habitable place that could accomodate all of its citizens. The programme was first enacted under former president Bill Clinton and subsequent presidents, George W. Bush and Barack Obama, renewed the programme. TPS has allowed those original refugees to continue to renew their visas to remain in the country for almost 20 years. More than 435,000 people have acquired visas under TPS programme; the people come from ten countries that have either been affected by natural disastors or war. Originally the programme, because it will not be renewed by the current sitting president, was set to expire in January 2018, but has been extended, supposedly, to allow for a smoother transition considering that a majority of people believed it would be renewed. People have raised their families here and have started careers. They have a home here-and they’re being kicked out. However, Nicaraguans have the choice to either offically apply for citizenship, or apply for another type of visa, in order to stay or they will be removed from the United States when TPS expires, officially, in 2019. Many Honduran and Nicaraguan immigrants, whose visas are set to expire in January 2018, less than two months, do not know if their visa renewal will be approved in time.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-41899733

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s